Leather furniture

 

 

Historically, the most common material for making leather furniture has been wood, but other materials, such as metal and stone, have also been used. Leather furniture designs have reflected the fashion of every era from ancient times to the present. Whereas in most periods a single style dominated, a wide variety of old and new styles influences current design.

Some of the most highly prized pieces of furniture used in contemporary homes, however, are antiques—pieces anywhere from 50 to 300 or more years old.

Today the most astute designers are eclectic, and furniture ranges from innovative designs to adaptations of historical models for special needs, including carefully made reproductions based on early example

 

 

 

 

 

Even the basic requirements of furniture design are complex, for appearance has always been as important as function, and the general tendency has been to design furniture to complement architectural interiors.

Indeed, some furniture forms were conceived architecturally, with legs designed as columns; others were at least in part anthropomorphic, with legs in animal forms. Furniture design ranges from simple to elaborate, depending on the pieces’ intended use rather than on the period in which they were made.

The earliest records, such as ancient Mesopotamian inventories, describe richly decorated interiors with gold cloth and gilded furniture. Some surviving ancient Egyptian examples are elaborate and were originally sheathed in gold, but many very plain pieces were also made in ancient times. In the history of furniture, however, the elegant work takes precedence because in general it has been the best preserved.

In addition, elaborate designs reveal the most about a period because high style changes more frequently than other styles to reflect new ideas. The simplest work, made for the farmer or labourer, tends to be more purely functional and timeless; tables and chairs used by working people in 1800 BC are surprisingly like tables and chairs in farmhouses of AD 1800.

 

 

 

 

Some people look at leather furniture as kitsch, unattractive and rather cliché. Not I, folks, and neither should you. Regardless of what other charlatans may say, leather furniture is sexy, sensual and comfortable. Sliding onto that leather furniture you just bought will take you to new levels of pleasure and impress the ladies too. Leather furniture shouts class, redefines quality and makes a great sound when you touch it. Every home needs something to make it feel special.

With leather furniture, you get all the comfort of a regular couch but the added style that only leather furniture can deliver. Leather furniture is like your favourite leather shoes, just bigger and with a completely different function. If only for the pungent smell of cow hide, every home needs leather furniture. Many people have leather coats, and if you do, you will know how great it looks and feels.

The same is true of leather furniture. When you buy your new leather furniture, you will soon be wondering how on earth you coped before with your regular, boring and pedestrian couch and chairs. Another advantage of leather furniture is that it is much easier to clean when you get drunk and spill beer all over the place as you attempt to move your lazy backside and grab another bag of cheetos. You will be amused by the shape your behind has left on your leather furniture, too.

Leather furniture really does provide all round comfort and all manner of entertainment. Buy it., love it, live it, loaf in it: Leather furniture is the next purchase you will make. Leather is a natural product that is fully chrome tanned and ideally fat liquored for long durability with normal use. Occasional routine maintenance of your leather upholstery using proper techniques and materials will preserve its beauty and prolong its life.

Never use saddle soap, solvents, abrasives or caustic household cleaners such as soap or dish detergent.


 

 

 

 

These vary widely in strength and in compatibility with today's water-based leather finishes, and may cause cracking or other damage to the leather surface. Direct sources of heat and extended exposure to direct sunlight may also be harmful to the leather and should be avoided. Finished Leathers are aniline-dyed and then enhanced with a light middle pigment coat for colour uniformity and a clear top coat for protection. These finishes are soft and breathable yet highly durable, and help reduce spotting, staining and colour fading.

Spills should be immediately blotted with a soft absorbent cloth whenever they occur, then gently cleaned, conditioned and protected with leather care products. Remove light topical soil by gently wiping with a water-dampened soft white cloth. Spills should be immediately blotted whenever they occur. Any residual stains may be gently treated using an absorbent white cloth dampened with a solution of water and mild, non-detergent soap. Avoid vigorous cleaning that may lift colour from the leather. After cleaning, allow leather to air dry away from direct heat.

 

 

 

 

An ottoman is a piece of furniture, a padded, upholstered seat or bench having neither back nor arms, often used as a stool or footstool. An ottoman can also be known as a footstool, hassock or pouf. Some ottomans are hollow, in which case they are often used as blanket boxes.

The word ottoman was introduced into English in the "footstool" sense in 1806 (probably from the identical French word, which also denotes a type of textile fabric). Because the ottomans typical use in a reclining position was associated in Europe with the Orient, in line with fashionable Turkish influence since the early 18th century (when the Balkans was still partially under Ottoman rule).

It is not supposed to have been invented by the Ottoman Turks (compare divan). These ottomans are made from many different animals and each one has its own character and looks stunning to me. Leather is a natural product that is fully chrome tanned and ideally fat liquored for long durability with normal use. Occasional routine maintenance of your leather upholstery using proper techniques and materials will help preserve its beauty and prolong its life.

Never use saddle soap, solvents, abrasives or caustic household cleaners such as soap or dish detergent. These vary widely in strength and in compatibility with today's water-based leather finishes, and may cause cracking or other damage to the leather surface. Direct sources of heat and extended exposure to direct sunlight may also be harmful to the leather and should be avoided. 

Finished Leathers are aniline-dyed and then enhanced with a light middle pigment coat for colour uniformity and a clear top coat for protection. These finishes are soft and breathable yet highly durable, and help reduce spotting, staining and colour fading.

Spills should be immediately blotted with a soft absorbent cloth whenever they occur, then gently cleaned, conditioned and protected with leather care products.


Remove light topical soil by gently wiping with a water-dampened soft white cloth. Spills should be immediately blotted whenever they occur. Any residual stains may be gently treated using an absorbent white cloth dampened with a solution of water and mild, non-detergent soap. Avoid vigorous cleaning that may lift colour from the leather. After cleaning, allow leather to air dry away from direct heat. 

Nubuck and suede should be routinely brushed and vacuumed to remove topical soil. Spills should be immediately blotted with an absorbent white cloth whenever they occur. Stains may be buffed with an ultra fine abrasive pad (e.g. 3M White) using just enough pressure to remove the stain. A soft bristle brush will help restore the soft suede or nubuck nap.

 

 

 

 Common Cleaning Problems



Ink Marks 
Treat early for best results.

  • Finished Leather: Use Ink & Stain Remover followed by Leather Cleaner, and then Conditioner and Protector.

  • Rub a white eraser quickly and firmly over the mark. Test in an inconspicuous area in advance.

Grease 
Gently lift excess grease with soft dry cloth.

  • Finished Leather: Clean with Leather Cleaner, and then treat with Conditioner and Protector.

  • Sprinkle cornstarch over affected area and cover with dampened white cloth for 4-6 hours; remove cloth and cornstarch. Repeat as needed.

Water 
Let dry slowly; do not use heat guns or air dryers. 

Food/Beverages 
Gently blot excess spill with soft damp cloth.

  • Finished Leather: Clean with Leather Cleaner, and then treat with Conditioner and Protector.

  • Dry slowly away from direct heat. 

    Blood/Urine 
    Flush from leather with clear water and soft cloth.

  • Finished Leather: Clean with Leather Cleaner, and then treat with Conditioner and Protector.

  • Dry slowly away from direct heat.

Wax 
Place ice cubes in plastic bag over wax until it becomes firm enough to gently lift from surface. Treat any residual marks as grease.

Gum 
Gently heat with hair dryer. Use clean white cloth to rub gum from surface onto cloth. Treat any residual marks as grease.

Note: If these procedures do not work for you, consult a professional leather care expert.

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